Sunday, September 04, 2016

Shrink Rap Embraces the Politically Incorrect (because this is kind of funny?), just for a moment.




Oh, I have to say, last week I was away for the week and saw a T-shirt that said, "Please, Lord, help me to be the person my dog thinks I am."  I thought of buying it.  But actually, I'm not that sure my dog thinks that well of me, and he's not the most articulate of persnickety and temperamental little creatures.

Today, I saw the sign above on Facebook, and I chuckled.  It's probably not the most politically correct of things to smile at, and I am not always the most politically correct of people, though it seems  important to at least try on a psychiatry blog, so here, I at least try.  I thought I'd give it up for a day and share this with you.  If you hate it, please forgive me.

In other news, 64 days until the election is over.

And there is an important article in The Washington Post on why more middle aged white women are dying of accidental drug overdoses -- not surprisingly part of the reason is that people get sleeping pills or anxiety medications (benzodiezapines) and take them together with opiates for pain -- a deadly combination.  So please, warn your patients about the dangers of respiratory depression with this combination like you would warn them not to drink alcohol with benzos. And know that if you're striving to be the person your psychiatrist medicates you to be, that person is alive and thriving.

2 comments:

tracy said...


Why don't you just write what you are thinking about or what you care about instead of sending us off to other articles?

withallmyheart said...

Although this particular post is a bit off-putting, I still appreciate the chance to understand it and identify what is important for me.

And, that is the addition I would make to it.

I am blessed to have a psychiatrist who strengthens me, especially as I falter. He carries my burdens, at times, until I can myself resume the load.

So, for me, I need add that "Help me be the person my psychiatrist and I wish to be.....".

I always align myself with my doctor, especially in session, if possible. When I am "not enough" it is the "We" that strengthens me.

It is the "Therapeutic We"/He and I that allows for (my) life to continue, and to grow.