Showing posts with label In Treatment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label In Treatment. Show all posts

Thursday, July 05, 2012

Coming Soon: Home Inspection, a novel by Dinah








Roy has convinced me that e-publishing on Amazon is the way to go with my  novels and my summer project is to get them up on Amazon's Kindle Direct.  One option on the Kindle e-publishing allows for authors to give their books away for free for a few days to promote them, and if this is an option I can use, I will be offering the first book, Home Inspection, for free to our Shrink Rap readers.  I've been aiming for a July 15th release date, but the wretched derecho and the power failures that have ensued may have slowed things down.  The young woman who is designing a cover for me had a tree in her bedroom and no power for 5 days, so we'll see.  A lot needs to get done in the next few days for this to happen by the 15th.


I just set up a Facebook Page for Home Inspection, if you'd like to read a little about it, click here.
 
While I wrote this novel many years ago, it is very much like a book version of the HBO series In Treatment.  The entire course of the book takes place in a psychiatrist's office and Dr. Julius Strand struggles with his own issues -- many of the same issues that In Treatment's Dr. Paul Weston faced around divorce, relationships with his children, and finding meaning in his life -- as he helps two patients sort through their own romantic confusion.  

But wait, you don't have a Kindle or an e-reader?  You can download a free Kindle app to your PC, Mac, iPad, android, blackberry, iPhone, or iTouch.  If you'd like a real book, I'm hoping to simultaneously get the books up on Amazon's CreateSpace which will allow readers to order hard copies, but I haven't even begun to figure that one out.

More novel news soon....

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

In Treatment: Adele, Week 7


Paul starts with the usual: he blames Adele for giving him bum advice and says she is responsible for Sunil's deportation. Ho hum.

Adele is in his face with how stuck his life is--- hmmm, didn't this guy just get divorced, move to Brooklyn, have his kid, leave his kid? I guess those don't count. Paul announces he's decided on the spot to stop practicing psychotherapy. Independently wealthy, I presume. And yesterday he broke off with his girlfriend and felt nothing. And then, in a rare moment of insight, Paul tells Adele he is stopping therapy, that it is just a repetition of the same patterns and he can't continue with this painstaking examination of transferential feelings. Adele implores him to stay; these people seem to feel that therapy is essential to life and that no change is possible without it. Paul says no, he must go. It seems like his first true insight in years. And then he announces he is no longer her patient and so it's fine if she tells him if she ever thought the two of them could be together. Some things never change? Until next year?

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

In Treatment: Jesse, Week 7



Jesse went to prison for hopping a train to Providence without paying. Another episode for ClinkShrink!

He's back in Paul's office with his dad, and dad doesn't have much use for shrinks. He tells Paul he should have been a plumber. And now that he and Jesse are cool, Jesse doesn't need to come.

Paul talks to Jesse alone. He implores Jesse to stay in treatment, and he puts it in terms of how he cares for Jesse and how Jesse will lose the gains he made. To watch Paul, leaving therapy is a catastrophic event, one that warrants blowing a few cerebral blood vessels. It's a do or die deal.

For once, could Paul just say, "I'm glad this has been helpful to you. I think there are still issues to address and it could continue to be helpful to you. If you need me, please do call."

Monday, December 06, 2010

In Treatment: Sunil, Week 7



ClinkShrink's dream has come true! A session in the jail. Sunil was locked up and soon he'll be deported back to India, and we learn that this was part of a grand plan, his only way to get home to India. He faked the whole creepy/dangerous scenario, aware that if the police came and he refused to show his papers, he'd get arrested and deported. Couldn't he just have shoplifted an apple?

Paul is angry. What was real? Was it all farce on his therapy? Sunil points out his assorted boundary transgressions as he created a therapist/friend scenario, and Sunil says that Paul got something out of the sessions as well in their shared loneliness. And to ease Paul's anger (oy, he curses at the patient, my idea of a no-no), he lets him in on a new twist to the stories, once again drawing Paul in: his wrong-caste girlfriend who committed suicide was pregnant with his baby.

Sunil sings to Paul as the guard escorts him off.

In Treatment: Frances, Week 7


Sunil doesn't come for his scheduled session. Instead, we get Frances.

Frances continues to struggle with her relationships with her teenage daughter, Izzy, and her terminally ill sister, Patricia. She now has to balance Izzy's wish to prolong Patricia's life with Patricia's wish to die peacefully at home. Should she "pull the plug?" She tells Paul how special it was when Patricia said she loved her, and how she feels like she'll be left alone with no one. Does Paul know how that feels. Indeed, he does.

The session bounces back to how sister Patricia was Paul's patient years ago. As she leaves, Frances asks, "Were you in love with her?" Please, Paul, just say no, she was a patient, her sister is now a patient, why would you have been in love with her and if you were, why would you have ever agreed to treat her sister, much less admit you had such feelings. Therapists don't owe their patients the right to every inner thought. Paul doesn't really answer, he just says that he cared about her a lot, an acceptable feeling to have for a patient.

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

In Treatment: Adele, Week 6


Adele and Paul spent the episode sparring. It's reminds me of some of his sessions with Gina, only not as good. Adele's manner feels forced, like she's reading her lines, and they all have the same inflection. Paul calls her 'remote,' and 'a Freudian ice goddess," that is when he's not cursing at her, saying she's a narcissist, or accusing her of purposely humiliating him by letting him express fantasies about having a relationship with her when, in fact, she's pregnant. She does inspire him to call Sunil's daughter-in-law and to see Sunil as a more imminent threat.

Watching a half hour on TV is draining enough. Glad my days aren't so filled with conflict, anger, angst, and interpersonal confrontation.

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

In Treatment: Jesse, Week 6


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

 Happy Birthday, Jesse! He's 17 and in all the glory of adolescent angst. Jesse is a black hole of need. To make 17 all the harder, Jesse continues to deal with issues of identity and belonging. It's probably not the easiest age to be gay or to be discovering birth parents.

Jesse's relationship with Paul has gotten much better, much warmer. I liked when Paul told him he would gain strength from his struggle. Finally, he has something positive and encouraging to say to a patient. And he's tender with Jesse as the parallels continue with his own angsty relationship with his son, Max.

In Treatment: Frances, Week 6 and a Few Words on Narcissism


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

 Frances spends the session grappling with her relationship with her dying sister and her angry teenage daughter. She wants Paul to feed her--she's hungry and he must have food, after all he lives here--but he refuses.

She leaves the stage to be with her sister after months of estrangement. They have a nice moment after Frances rescues the sister, bathes her, and puts her to bed. But it's short lived--the sister wakes up confused and needs to go to the hospital.

Frances has a tendency to look at all of her interactions as centering on herself. Her sister's warm declarations become meaningless when replaced by febrile mumblings. Paul's look is skeptical. She feels constantly judged and she looks for repeated approval and reassurance. Her daughter hates her, and it can't just be that the daughter is a teenager who is struggling with her aunt's terminal illness, her parent's divorce, and the tumultuous world of teenagers, it has to be about Frances. Ah, the teenager says Frances is a narcissist and that's untreatable. Is this true?

From my point of view, I don't believe that people change their personalities much. But therapy does seem to help people re-frame things, recognize their patterns, say "oh, I'm doing
that again" and question what is going on. If I don't think I can "fix" something, I work on reframing it in a positive way. Most traits can be both good and bad, and the choice of words makes all the difference in the world. A shrink might tell Frances that it seems to be true that she likes being the center of attention, most actresses do, and it's a pretty helpful characteristic to have if you're going to be the star of the show. But maybe the sister's death isn't about Frances, and maybe she shouldn't take everyone else's distress too personally.

Ah, and here's a link to an editorial in the NY Times about the fate of Narcissistic Personality Disorder in the New DSM.

Monday, November 29, 2010

In Treatment: Sunil, Week 6


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

 Julia comes in first. She was injured when Sunil pushed her and she says that he is worse. Treatment is not helping and she is no longer going to pay for it. Her husband will need to prescribe stronger medications for his father (or perhaps the houseplant).

Sunil continues to evade the questions. He sings in Bengali for Paul, a farewell song. When he says words in Bengali, Paul cuts him off, rather rudely, and tells him to speak English. Sunil asks Paul to keep an old cricket bat he's found; he might be tempted to use it to murder or maim or do something bad to Julia.

Paul is rather worked up during this session and he implores Julia to allow Sunil to continue in treatment. He further implores Sunil to keep coming. He offers to see Sunil
pro bono, or to meet him outside the office for tea.

This episode requires that the viewer suspend disbelief in the realities of psychiatric treatment. It's a world with no psychiatrists, no hospitals, no rationale use of medications, no duty to prevent harm, and no sense that violence can come from a illness that one can't be talked out of. There is faith that treatment will ultimately lead to betterment, even when things are getting worse and the characters may not live through the day.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

In Treatment: Adele, Week 5, revised




Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

 
Could someone please be warm and fuzzy?

------------------------------------------
Roy thinks this was a mistake, that I didn't finish the post, but this was all I had to say. It was a contentious and uncomfortable session and by the end, I wanted to go home. Ah, I was at home! These people are not nice, and who would want to pay for this kind of confrontation, unleashed emotion, and discomfort. Paul is a handful, and now we hear his fantasies about a life together with Adele, and that he's watching her building (for an hour after the last session!) and knows she doesn't have any patients after him, so at 6 o'clock at night, she should be happy to extend his session. It's like Jesse, only at least we can excuse Jesse's immaturity as adolescence. And why is everyone in this show a stalker? I did not think that Adele did as a good a job as before: she openly sneared at Paul in the beginning, and she angrily confronted him with his refusal to look at the important things and his rigidity.

Just a hint: name calling makes people defensive. They are more likely to consider your thoughts if you couch them in kind terms or universal phenomena that make them easier to swallow: "it's difficult to look at your own weaknesses"..."there are parts of your style that serve you very well..."

Ok, Roy won, I wrote more.

In Treatment: Jesse, Week 5


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

High drama here on HBO. And Paul chases yet another patient out of his office.

Paul is making pancakes for dinner with his son, Max, and trying all-too-hard to connect with the quiet pre-teen. A knock at the door and it's patient Jesse, in distress. He needs an emergency session and Paul leaves Max to go to Jesse.

Jesse went to see his birth parents. He showed up early and there were kids in the yard. He left and returned at the appointed time, stoned. The kids were gone, without a trace, and one was in a wheelchair. Maybe the birth parents had searched for Jesse because they want his organs for the sick kid. Oh, and they asked Jesse to leave, perhaps because he asked them for money.

Paul confronts Jesse with his habit of testing people and using their failure as proof that Jesse is no good. It's a pattern, he's done it tonight by showing up at Paul's apartment. Injured, Jesse runs out with Paul yelling at him not to leave. We call this therapy? Paul follows Jesse and they sit on the steps more calmly. Until, the smoke detector goes off and Paul has to choose between Jesse and saving his son from the burning building (or rather, the burning pancakes). Everyone here needs a hug.

So what about the boundaries of the home office? And why doesn't Paul recognize that his timing sucks: when someone is in a state of distress, they need a little empathy, warmth, and kindness, not an interpretation of all their faults as a human being. I'd kind of like to take his batteries out about now.

In Treatment: Frances, Week 5


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

Frances continues to be flirtatious and provocative. She insists that Paul open and read her cancer gene results, just as she tried to get him to run play lines with her, but this time he bites. The results are negative. They are both relieved, but the sparring continues.

Frances remains jealous that her daughter wants to be with her dying sister, Patricia (Paul's former patient of 20 years ago).

Last night, Frances had sex for the first time since her husband left her, with a man 20 years her junior. She seems to enjoy giving Paul the details.

And what happened between you and my sister, Frances asks Paul. She says you were in love with her. Were you? If Paul's not provoked by this, maybe he can see it through.

Frances isn't going to see her dying sister. Paul tries to explore this and he finally tells her, point blank, that she needs to go see her sister before she dies or she will regret it forever. This as he chases her to the door.

Why are Paul's patients always storming off with him on their tail?
-------------------
The chinchilla is for Jesse.

Monday, November 22, 2010

In Treatment: Sunil, Week 5


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 6: Sunil - Frances - Jesse

ClinkShrink, where are you when we need you?

The buildup continues as Paul worries that Sunil might be homicidal.

He feels like a prisoner in Brooklyn, while back home the monsoons are causing devastating floods. Paul believes that his problems could be fixed by better communication. Tell your son you want to move. Sunil is frustrated in his attempts to get Paul to understand his life. He can't leave, can't go home, and must stay put in his son's residence. Paul thinks Sunil could get a job and move into his own apartment. To make matters worse, Paul insists on talking about Sunil's dream, and Sunil gets outraged when Paul concludes that a character in the dream is the former girlfriend, despite Sunil's protests. So what else is new?

Sunil is convinced that his daughter-in-law is having and affair, and that she is mocking him-- something he finds humiliating. He is enraged and wants to smother her, or perhaps her laughter. He tries her bedroom door, and thinks of calling Paul in the middle of the night.

Paul is clearly worried, and he says so. He doesn't ever ask outright if Sunil is thinking of killing Julia. He talks to Sunil about what stress he is under, and just as I think he's going to suggest that Sunil go into the hospital, he recommends he come twice a week for therapy. It's certainly understandable that Paul would want to keep closer tabs on Sunil, but is digging deeper a good idea? The patient seems to be unraveling, and Paul tends to find the strands then pull and pull.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

In Treatment: Adele, Week 4


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele

Grand Rounds in the medical blogosphere will be on Gratitude this week. Roy wants me to write a post on gratitude. ClinkShrink wants me to write a book about In Treatment. I am grateful I have friends to help me figure out how to spend my time and keep me off the streets. Does this count? Perhaps the Grand Rounds folks would like to read about In Treatment?
_______________
Great line, Adele to Paul: "At a certain point, you have to move past the stories you've assigned to your life."

Paul says he lacks passion, something that everyone else has. Adele, he says, has passion for this,
this being her work. At first it seems a bit narcissistic....Paul is assuming she loves her work, because her work, after all, is talking to him, and no one wants to think that their therapist hates coming to work. But then we learn that Paul has Googled Adele, and part of why he assumes she loves her work is because she's written a lot-- she must have passion.

Adele is a bit stiff for my taste. I like animated people. But she's a good therapist for a fictional character--she's attentive and able to distill patterns, and she has good insights. So just as I'm thinking that Adele is such a much better example of a therapist than Paul is because she doesn't get in his face and say confrontational, contentious things, she blows it. Paul talks about how caring for his sick mother stifled his childhood, and Adele proposes that he may have used this as an excuse to hide. He says no, this doesn't feel right, but Adele insists it is. I hate it when they do that.

Finally, Paul was distracted during sex this afternoon. You knew he was thinking about Adele, that he has become attracted to her, and in this episode her eyes have become so much more flirtatious. New makeup or camera angles, I suppose? And at the end of the session, he tells her she's right when she says he holds back, and he tells her he's been thinking about her (during sex with his girlfriend). Textbook transference, he says, as though being a therapist himself should make him above all that. It's a compelling session, and we're left to wonder if Adele can hold her boundaries (we think so) and what will happen next week.

I'm grateful that someone somewhere might be interested in my thoughts on a TV show. Thank you for reading!


Wednesday, November 17, 2010

In Treatment: Jesse, Week 4


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele

It's thundering outside, an extra component to this week's stormy session with Jesse.

Jesse is struggling as he copes with communications from both his birth parents. His adoptive parents were angry--- a sign that they want him. "I have ADD and I'm a slut. Who would want me? Would you?" Paul says "Yes." It was a nice thing to say, I'm not so sure I believe him. And he answers this charged question, but won't answer when Jesse asks if Paul likes the letter Jesse crafted to his birth parents. Both of Jesse's moms are depressed, it seems. Marissa hasn't gotten out of bed for a week-- not since her visit to Jesse's psychotherapy session, and Karen always gets depressed around his birthday, presumably out of grief that she gave her baby away.

Jesse is still cursing, but overall, he's become more insightful, less ready to charge, and less provocative. My satellite blitzed for the last few seconds of the show, so fill me in. Jesse leaves and Paul still has all the letters to and from Jesse's birth dad. And what's with the show opener where he's sniffing spices? Still trying to figure out if he has Parkinson's Disease? I guess it's the season-long personal life of the therapist theme.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

In Treatment: Frances, Week 4


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Paul rejects Frances yet again. He wouldn't run lines with her last week, and this week he won't accept tickets to her play. He suggests she bring her sick sister or her estranged daughter, but Frances isn't biting.

She talks about how her dying mother came to see her in play; they celebrated with champagne. But the trip was hard on her mother and she feels guilty for having had her mother come at all. She was no good when mom was sick-- "inept" and vomited in the hospital sink. Her sister's illness has revived all these issue around death.

Who is Frances? She puts herself down and she can't accept a compliment. Fame and accolades and she goes home to a dark apartment and soup from a can. She checks her makeup in the mirror before she leaves the session and worries about who might be in the waiting room. She feels like a empty receptacle that can never be filled.

In Treatment: Sunil, Week 4


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele

Sunil remains kind of creepy. He sneeked into his daughter-in-law's private study and found her birth control pills---proof, he says, that she's having an affair. Is he delusional? And he had this disturbing dream where he was burying an animal, one that had fallen from a cliff, and when he awoke, he went to his son's bedroom and watched him and his wife sleep. For fifteen minutes. Really creepy.

We learn that Sunil's former lover broke off their relationship on the library steps and then threw herself off a bridge. He was questioned when the police investigated her death, an apparent suicide.

Paul continues to confront Sunil. The birth control pills might not be proof of an affair. Sunil wants to change the subject and Paul stops him. The relationship Sunil had with his lover is similar to his son's relationship with his wife, and this is why Sunil is so troubled by it. When the patient disagrees, Paul does not back down--- he tells Sunil how it is. Does anyone else find it insulting when a therapist insists that a patient feels something he says he doesn't? Sunil considers Paul's theory, thanks him and leaves.

Paul is clearly worried about what Sunil may do. Call if you have disturbing thoughts. The frustration of both parties is palpable--- at times, Sunil raises his voice in an effort to be heard, especially about his right to snoop in his daughter-in-law's study. And Paul....well, Paul always looks frustrated.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

In Treatment: Adele, Week 3.



Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele

 Paul is upset that Adele doesn't have any Motrin to treat his headache. Adele doesn't recall his son's name fast enough. On the scoreboard, Adele is losing.

Paul gets up and walks around the room. Adele wants him to sit. He doesn't, at least not at first. He tells her a little about his patient, "You know what's going on here, it's perfectly obvious." But she doesn't. He wants her suggestions and Adele doesn't want to be both therapist and supervisor.

Paul talks about Max (his son, not my dog). He makes a lot of assumptions about....everything. Adele sums up the session by telling Paul that he has been pushing her to take care of him. She cites the evidence to prove her case.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

In Treatment: Jesse, Week 3


Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele

Why is Paul always chasing people?

Jesse brings his mother to the session, but he doesn't want it known that he wanted her to come. Jesse continues to alternate between being a gentle, vulnerable boy and being a provocative, hurtful monster. He tells his mother about the sexual event, in all it's glorious detail, that got him beaten up and suspended from school, and just in case that's not enough, he announces that his birth mother wants him back. Mom gets upset and leaves the room. Paul asks her to stay. Why does he do that? When someone says "enough" or "I need space," maybe it makes sense to listen.

Paul tells Jesse he's creative, an artist. I like that, he's saying something to build the kid up. He tells Jesse that his own son is an artist and that sometimes he doesn't understand him and feels distant. Is this the right thing to do? At first it seemed kind, like an attempt to connect with Jesse, but for a moment I wondered who was the patient. The revelation doesn't seem to have an impact on Jesse, who is drowning in his own complicated life and problems. He wants so much to be loved and valued as he pushes the world away.

Paul asks Jesse if he's heard from, or contacted his birth mother, and Jesse abruptly stands and leaves. Paul follows him to the door, not just to say goodbye, but to continue the session as Jesse is trying to end.
And Mom, who Jesse had believed would leave, is still in the waiting room.

Monday, November 08, 2010

In Treatment: Frances, Week 3



Week 1: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 2: Sunil - Frances - Jesse/Adele
Week 3: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele

Week 4: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele
Week 5: Sunil - Frances - Jesse - Adele


Meet Edgar. He's Roy's dog. My best bet is that Edgar secretly watches In Treatment.

Paul asks his girlfriend if he has 'happiness deficit.' She hasn't seemed to notice what a miserable creature he is.

Frances is a hurricane of stories about her mother, her daughter, and her sister. The sister, you'll recall, was once a patient of Paul's and the entire session is a play of who is having a relationship with whom and of competing jealousies. Mom liked sister more, even from infancy, and now daughter likes her dying sister more. Frances is always on the outside, always the one abandoned by everyone else, and on cue, Paul recalls how the patient used to put lipstick on her dying mother until the very end. Oops, Paul got the wrong patient, it's a story that the sister had told him 18 years ago! One more jealousy. And Frances wants Paul to help rehearse her lines, like her ex-husband used to do. He refuses and she storms out. Somehow, he feels more like the patient in this episode as he fumbles to apologize and cover his mistakes. Ah, the episode started that way when he fell asleep and the patient's knocking woke him--and he lied to conceal that he'd been asleep.

Usually, I find it easy to criticize Paul as a therapist. In this episode, however, I felt like I could relate to his mistakes. We all have moments where we slip--forget the name of a patient's spouse, confuse a story with one another patient told...he's put on the spot, and somehow I know how he feels. Yes, Clink, I know, it's just a TV show and they're not real.